Roemheld Syndrome Diet Plan

Roemheld Syndrome Diet Plan: Unlocking the Key to Digestive Wellness

Roemheld syndrome diet plan


In today’s fast-paced world, maintaining a healthy lifestyle is of paramount importance. A vital aspect of overall well-being is ensuring proper digestion, as it directly impacts our daily lives. Unfortunately, many individuals suffer from various digestive disorders that can disrupt their quality of life. One such condition is Roemheld Syndrome, also known as gastrocardiac syndrome, which manifests as a collection of gastrointestinal and cardiac symptoms. While medical intervention is essential in managing this syndrome, adopting a well-balanced diet plan can significantly alleviate symptoms and promote digestive wellness. In this comprehensive guide, we will explore the Roemheld Syndrome diet plan, offering valuable insights and recommendations to help you achieve optimal digestive health.


Understanding Roemheld Syndrome

Roemheld Syndrome is characterized by the presence of excessive gas in the gastrointestinal tract, leading to cardiovascular symptoms such as palpitations, shortness of breath, and even chest pain. It occurs due to an abnormal interaction between the digestive system and the cardiovascular system, often triggered by the fermentation of certain foods in the gut. While this syndrome may be challenging to diagnose, it is crucial to address its underlying causes to improve symptoms and prevent further complications.

Roemheld syndrome diet plan


The Role of Diet in Roemheld Syndrome

Diet plays a significant role in managing Roemheld Syndrome. By understanding the impact of specific food choices on digestive health, individuals can adopt a targeted diet plan to minimize symptoms and support overall well-being. Let’s delve into some key dietary recommendations to help you regain control over your digestive system:


1. Identify and Eliminate Trigger Foods

Start by identifying foods that trigger symptoms and eliminating them from your diet. Common culprits include gas-producing foods such as beans, lentils, cabbage, onions, and carbonated beverages. Although individual triggers may vary, keeping a food diary can help pinpoint problematic ingredients and enable you to make informed decisions regarding your dietary choices.


2. Emphasize Fiber-Rich Foods

Incorporating an adequate amount of fiber in your diet is essential for maintaining regular bowel movements and supporting digestive health. Opt for whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and legumes, as they provide an excellent source of dietary fiber. Not only will this promote a healthy digestive system, but it will also help manage weight and prevent cardiovascular complications.


3. Moderate Fat Intake

While healthy fats are an essential part of a balanced diet, excessive fat consumption can lead to digestive disturbances. Focus on consuming moderate amounts of sources like avocados, nuts, seeds, and olive oil. By striking a balance, you can provide your body with the necessary nutrients while avoiding unnecessary strain on the digestive system.


4. Stay Hydrated

Adequate hydration is crucial for maintaining optimal digestive function. Make sure to drink an adequate amount of water throughout the day, as it helps soften stools and prevents constipation. Avoid excessive consumption of caffeinated and alcoholic beverages, as they can contribute to dehydration and worsen symptoms associated with Roemheld Syndrome.


5. Mindful Eating Practices

In addition to food choices, adopting mindful eating practices can significantly improve your digestive health. Take your time while eating, chew food thoroughly, and savor each bite. Eating slowly allows your body to properly digest food, minimizing the occurrence of uncomfortable symptoms associated with Roemheld Syndrome.


6. Probiotics and Digestive Enzymes

Incorporating probiotics and digestive enzymes into your diet can provide additional support for your digestive system. Probiotics help restore the balance of beneficial bacteria in the gut, promoting healthy digestion. Digestive enzymes, on the other hand, aid in the breakdown and absorption of nutrients, reducing the strain on the gastrointestinal system.


7. Stress Managementand Lifestyle Modifications

Stress has a profound impact on digestive health, exacerbating symptoms associated with Roemheld Syndrome. Engage in stress-reducing activities such as yoga, meditation, or regular exercise to promote relaxation and improve overall well-being. Additionally, ensure you get an adequate amount of sleep each night, as restful sleep is essential for proper digestion and overall health.


Putting It All Together: A Sample Roemheld Syndrome Diet Plan

To provide you with a practical approach, here’s a sample Roemheld Syndrome diet plan that incorporates the aforementioned recommendations:


Breakfast:

  • Overnight oats with fresh berries and a sprinkle of chia seeds
  • Herbal tea or water
    Snack:
  • Greek yogurt with sliced almonds and a drizzle of honey

Lunch:

  • Grilled chicken breast with a side of steamed vegetables and quinoa
  • Green salad with olive oil and lemon dressing
    Snack:
  • Carrot sticks with hummus

Dinner:

  • Baked salmon with roasted sweet potatoes and asparagus
  • Brown rice or quinoa
  • Herbal tea or water

Evening Snack:

  • Fresh fruit salad

Remember, this is just a sample diet plan, and individual preferences and dietary restrictions may vary. It’s important to consult with a healthcare professional or registered dietitian to tailor a diet plan that suits your specific needs.

Conclusion: Unlocking Digestive Wellness with the Roemheld Syndrome Diet Plan

By following a well-balanced Roemheld Syndrome diet plan, you can take significant strides towards managing symptoms and improving your digestive health. Identifying trigger foods, incorporating fiber-rich foods, moderating fat intake, staying hydrated, practicing mindful eating, and considering probiotics and digestive enzymes are all essential components of a comprehensive approach. Furthermore, adopting stress management techniques and making positive lifestyle modifications can contribute to overall well-being.
Remember, maintaining a healthy lifestyle is a continuous journey. By prioritizing your digestive health through a targeted diet plan, you can unlock the key to digestive wellness and regain control over your life.

FAQ’S

Q. How do you stop Roemheld syndrome?

A. Roemheld syndrome, also known as gastrocardiac syndrome, is a condition characterized by a variety of gastrointestinal symptoms that can lead to cardiac disturbances. While I can provide some general information, it’s important to consult with a healthcare professional for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan. The following measures may help manage Roemheld syndrome:

  1. Dietary adjustments: Certain foods and beverages can trigger or exacerbate symptoms. It may be helpful to identify and avoid foods that worsen your symptoms. Common triggers include carbonated drinks, fatty or fried foods, spicy foods, caffeine, alcohol, and artificial sweeteners.
  2. Eat smaller meals: Consuming smaller, more frequent meals rather than large meals can prevent excessive pressure on the stomach and reduce symptoms.
  3. Avoid lying down after meals: Wait at least two to three hours after eating before lying down or going to bed. This helps to prevent acid reflux and reduces the likelihood of symptoms.
  4. Elevate the head of the bed: If you experience symptoms during sleep, raising the head of your bed by using pillows or a bed wedge can help prevent acid reflux and alleviate symptoms.
  5. Stress management: Stress and anxiety can contribute to the development and exacerbation of Roemheld syndrome symptoms. Engaging in relaxation techniques such as deep breathing exercises, meditation, or yoga may help reduce stress levels and alleviate symptoms.
  6. Medications: Depending on the severity of your symptoms, your healthcare provider may recommend medications such as antacids, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), or H2 blockers to reduce gastric acid production and relieve symptoms. However, medication should be prescribed by a healthcare professional.

Q. What triggers Roemheld syndrome?

A. Roemheld syndrome, or gastrocardiac syndrome, can be triggered by a variety of factors. While the exact cause is not fully understood, it is believed to involve the interaction between the gastrointestinal system and the cardiovascular system. Some potential triggers include:

  1. Gastrointestinal issues: Conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), hiatal hernia, peptic ulcers, gastritis, or other digestive disorders can contribute to Roemheld syndrome.
  2. Gas and bloating: The accumulation of gas in the gastrointestinal tract can cause distension and put pressure on the diaphragm, which may lead to cardiac symptoms.
  3. Overeating: Consuming large meals can result in increased pressure on the stomach and lead to reflux, bloating, and subsequent cardiac symptoms.
  4. Food triggers: Certain foods and beverages can aggravate Roemheld syndrome symptoms in susceptible individuals. Common triggers include carbonated drinks, fatty or fried foods, spicy foods, caffeine, alcohol, and artificial sweeteners.
  5. Stress and anxiety: Emotional stress, anxiety, and other psychological factors can contribute to the development or worsening of Roemheld syndrome symptoms.
  6. Posture and body position: Lying down or bending over after a meal can increase the likelihood of acid reflux and the subsequent cardiac symptoms.
  7. Hormonal changes: Some individuals may experience an exacerbation of symptoms during hormonal changes, such as menstruation or menopause

Q. How do I relieve the symptoms of Roemheld syndrome?

A. Roemheld syndrome, also known as gastrocardiac syndrome, refers to a condition where gastrointestinal disturbances lead to cardiac symptoms such as palpitations, chest pain, and shortness of breath. While I’m an AI language model and not a healthcare professional, I can offer some general suggestions that may help alleviate the symptoms. However, it’s important to consult with a qualified healthcare provider for an accurate diagnosis and personalized treatment plan. Here are a few potential strategies to consider:

  1. Dietary adjustments: Pay attention to your diet and identify any specific triggers that worsen your symptoms. Some common triggers include spicy foods, caffeine, fatty or greasy foods, alcohol, and carbonated beverages. Experiment with eliminating or reducing these triggers from your diet to see if it improves your symptoms.
  2. Eat smaller, frequent meals: Opt for smaller, more frequent meals throughout the day instead of large, heavy meals. This can help reduce the strain on your digestive system and minimize the chances of triggering symptoms.
  3. Avoid lying down immediately after eating: Give yourself some time to digest your food before lying down or going to bed. Gravity can help keep the stomach contents down and reduce the likelihood of reflux and associated symptoms.
  4. Maintain a healthy weight: If you’re overweight, losing weight in a gradual and healthy manner may help alleviate symptoms. Excess weight can put pressure on the stomach and contribute to reflux and other gastrointestinal issues.
  5. Manage stress: Stress and anxiety can worsen symptoms in some individuals. Consider incorporating stress management techniques such as deep breathing exercises, meditation, yoga, or engaging in activities you enjoy to help reduce stress levels.
  6. Raise the head of your bed: Elevating the head of your bed by 6-8 inches (using bed risers or extra pillows) can help prevent stomach acid from flowing back into the esophagus during sleep, reducing the chances of experiencing reflux symptoms.
  7. Medications: Over-the-counter antacids or acid-reducing medications like H2 blockers or proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may provide temporary relief. However, it’s essential to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any medications, as they can have side effects and interactions with other medications.

Q. What is Roemheld Syndrome?

A. Roemheld syndrome, also known as gastrocardiac syndrome or gastric-cardia syndrome, is a condition characterized by the presence of cardiac and gastrointestinal symptoms. It is named after Ludwig von Roemheld, a German internist who first described the syndrome in the early 20th century.

Roemheld syndrome is believed to occur as a result of excessive gas accumulation or bloating in the gastrointestinal tract, which can put pressure on the diaphragm and affect the functioning of the heart. This pressure on the diaphragm can lead to various cardiac symptoms, including palpitations, arrhythmias, chest pain, and shortness of breath.

The exact causes of Roemheld syndrome are not fully understood, but it is thought to be associated with conditions that cause increased gas production or retention in the gastrointestinal tract. Factors that may contribute to the syndrome include gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), hiatal hernia, gastritis, peptic ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and excessive swallowing of air.

The symptoms of Roemheld syndrome can vary from person to person and may include heart palpitations, irregular heartbeats, chest pain or discomfort, shortness of breath, dizziness, nausea, and bloating. These symptoms often occur after eating, especially after consuming a large meal or foods that are known to cause gas.

Diagnosing Roemheld syndrome can be challenging since the symptoms can mimic those of other cardiac and gastrointestinal disorders. A thorough medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests such as electrocardiogram (ECG), echocardiogram, and gastrointestinal studies may be performed to rule out other conditions.

Treatment of Roemheld syndrome focuses on managing the underlying causes and relieving symptoms. This may involve lifestyle modifications such as eating smaller meals, avoiding trigger foods, maintaining a healthy weight, and managing stress. Medications to reduce gastric acid production or improve gastrointestinal motility may also be prescribed

Doctor examining patient throat for the early warning signs of thyroid problems

Early Warning Signs of Thyroid Problems: What You Need to Know

Do you suspect that you may have thyroid problems? if so, it is important to be aware of the early warning signs of thyroid problems. These problems can affect anyone without considering gender or race, but the point to note is that they are most common in women and people over the age of 60. Worry out in this article, we will discuss the early warning signs of thyroid problems and what you can do to prevent or manage them.

The Thyroid Gland and Its Function

Before diving into the early warning signs of thyroid problems, let’s first discuss what the thyroid gland is and its functions within the body. The thyroid gland is a small, butterfly-shaped gland located in the front of the neck, just beneath the Adam’s apple. Despite its small size, the thyroid gland plays a crucial role in regulating the body’s metabolism, which is the process by which the body converts food into energy, especially Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP).

There are two hormones produced by thyroid gland:
  1. Thyroxine (T4).
  2. Triiodothyronine (T3).

These hormones are released into the bloodstream and pass throughout the body, regulating metabolism in every cell.

Pituitary gland is the controller of thyroid gland, which is located at the base of the brain. The pituitary gland produces a hormone known as thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which tells the thyroid gland when there is a demand of producing more or less thyroid hormones.

Sometimes this gland can become overactive or underactive, that may lead to a range of symptoms that can cause or impact our overall health and wellbeing. In this article, we’ll explore the early warning signs of thyroid problems, so you can recognize them and seek appropriate treatment if necessary.

Early Warning Signs of Thyroid Issues

Thyroid problems can cause a wide range of symptoms, which can make it challenging to diagnose. So many questions were asked concerned about thyroid problems like what are early warning signs of overactive thyroid problems? Here are some of the most common early warning signs of thyroid problems to be aware of:

1. Fatigue and Weakness

Feeling tired and weak all the time, despite getting enough sleep, could be an early warning sign of thyroid problems, particularly an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). Also it is associated with breathing problems {can thyroid problems affect your breathing?). This is because the thyroid gland produces hormones that regulate our energy levels. When these hormones are too low, it can cause fatigue and weakness.

2. Weight Gain

Unexplained weight gain, particularly around the belly, can be an early warning sign of thyroid problems, specifically an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). This is because the thyroid gland produces hormones that regulate the body’s metabolism, and when there’s not enough of these hormones, it can slow down metabolism and make it harder to burn calories, which can lead to weight gain.

3. Mood Changes

Thyroid problems can affect not just your physical health, but your mental health as well. Mood swings, anxiety, and depression can all be linked to thyroid issues, whether it’s an underactive or overactive thyroid. When the thyroid gland produces too many or too few hormones, it can affect the brain’s chemistry and lead to changes in mood. If you’re experiencing sudden shifts in mood or increased anxiety and depression, it’s worth considering the possibility of a thyroid problem and discussing it with your healthcare provider. Early detection and treatment can help manage both your physical and mental health.

4. Hair Loss

Thinning hair on the scalp may indicate an underactive thyroid as hair follicles rely on adequate levels of thyroid hormones for proper functioning. Low levels of thyroid hormones can cause hair loss, making it one of the early warning signs of thyroid problems to watch out for. Therefore, if you notice significant hair loss on your scalp or other symptoms such as fatigue, weight changes, sensitivity to cold, or constipation, it’s essential to consult a healthcare professional to evaluate whether you have an underactive thyroid. Early detection of thyroid problems can lead to timely treatment and improve your overall health and quality of life.

5. Irregular Periods

Thyroid problems can have an impact on the menstrual cycle. If you’re experiencing any changes to your menstrual cycle, it could be an early warning sign of thyroid problems. Women with an underactive thyroid may experience heavier or more prolonged periods, while women with an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism) may have lighter or infrequent periods. An accurate diagnosis and timely treatment can help manage thyroid problems and restore hormonal balance, thereby improving your overall health and well-being.

6. Muscle Pain and Stiffness

Muscle pain and stiffness, especially in the arms and legs, can indicate an underactive thyroid. Low thyroid hormone levels can affect the muscles’ ability to relax and contract correctly, leading to these symptoms. Therefore, if you experience muscle pain or stiffness, it could be one of the early warning signs of thyroid problems that you should be aware of. Other symptoms include fatigue, hair loss, weight changes, sensitivity to cold, constipation, and changes in the menstrual cycle in women.

If you notice any of these symptoms, it’s essential to consult a healthcare professional. Early detection of thyroid problems can help manage the condition and prevent further complications. Your doctor may perform a physical examination, blood tests, and other diagnostic tests to determine if you have an underactive thyroid or other thyroid problems. Appropriate treatment can help regulate thyroid hormone levels, relieve symptoms, and improve your quality of life.

7. Temperature Sensitivity

Changes in body temperature can be early warning signs of thyroid problems. People with an underactive thyroid may feel cold all the time, even when others feel warm. In contrast, people with an overactive thyroid may feel hot and sweaty all the time, even when the weather is cool.

Thyroid problems can have a significant impact on your health and well-being. Early detection and timely treatment can help manage the condition and prevent further complications.

If you experience any of the early warning signs of thyroid problems such as fatigue, hair loss, weight changes, sensitivity to cold, constipation, changes in the menstrual cycle in women, muscle pain and stiffness, or changes in body temperature, it’s essential to consult a healthcare professional.

Your doctor may perform a physical examination, blood tests, and other diagnostic tests to determine if you have an underactive thyroid or other thyroid problems.

If diagnosed with an underactive thyroid, your doctor may prescribe hormone replacement therapy to regulate thyroid hormone levels.

Treatment for an overactive thyroid may include medications to slow down thyroid hormone production or radioactive iodine treatment to destroy overactive thyroid cells.

As we have already discussed above about thyroid warning signs, if you experience any of the early warning signs of thyroid problems, don’t hesitate to see a doctor. Early diagnosis and treatment can help improve your quality of life and prevent further complications.

Treatment Options

The treatment options for thyroid problems depend on the type and severity of the condition. For an underactive thyroid, hormone replacement therapy can help regulate thyroid hormone levels. The medication is usually taken orally, and the dosage may need to be adjusted over time to achieve optimal results. It’s essential to follow your doctor’s instructions carefully and attend follow-up appointments to monitor your condition.

Early Warning Signs of Thyroid Problems

For an overactive thyroid, there are several treatment options, including medications to slow down thyroid hormone production or radioactive iodine treatment to destroy overactive thyroid cells. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove the thyroid gland.

Your doctor will determine the best course of treatment based on your individual needs and health status. It’s important to follow the prescribed treatment plan and attend regular follow-up appointments to monitor your condition and adjust treatment as necessary.

In addition to medical treatment, lifestyle modifications such as regular exercise, a balanced diet, and stress management techniques can help support thyroid health and improve overall well-being. If you have any questions or concerns about thyroid problems or their treatment, be sure to discuss them with your healthcare provider.

Early detection and treatment are critical in managing thyroid problems, which can have a significant impact on a person’s health and well-being. Recognizing the early warning signs of thyroid problems, such as hair loss, menstrual changes, muscle pain, and temperature sensitivity, can help individuals seek medical attention promptly. Your healthcare provider can perform diagnostic tests and determine the best course of treatment based on your individual needs and health status, which may include hormone replacement therapy, medication, or surgery. In addition to medical treatment, lifestyle modifications such as regular exercise, a balanced diet, and stress management techniques can support thyroid health and improve overall well-being.

Remember to follow your doctor’s instructions carefully and attend regular follow-up appointments to monitor your condition and adjust treatment as necessary for optimal health outcomes. Don’t miss our articles on the issues related to thyroid problems like
What are early warning signs of thyroid cancer?19 signs of thyroid problems, symptoms of thyroid in female and so many, Don’t miss them.

Related FAQs:

What are the early warning signs your thyroid is in trouble?

The thyroid gland plays a vital role in regulating your body’s metabolism. When something goes wrong with your thyroid, it can result in a variety of symptoms, including:

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, it is important to speak with your healthcare provider to determine if your thyroid is the underlying cause.

How do I know if something is wrong with my thyroid?

There are several ways to determine if something is wrong with your thyroid. Your healthcare provider can perform a physical examination to check for any signs of thyroid enlargement or abnormalities.

They may also order blood tests to measure the levels of thyroid hormones in your body, as well as thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which can indicate if your thyroid is overactive or underactive.

In addition, if you are experiencing symptoms like those listed above, it is important to discuss them with your healthcare provider to determine if your thyroid may be the underlying cause.

How do I check my thyroid at home?

While it is not possible to check your thyroid at home in the same way that a healthcare provider can, there are some self-checks you can do to monitor for any changes or abnormalities. These include:

  • Checking for any enlargement or lumps in your neck.
  • Paying attention to any changes in your energy levels or mood.
  • Monitoring your weight and any changes in your appetite or digestion.
  • Checking for any changes in your hair or skin texture.
A bored children refusing to cooperate with her doctor, effect of Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and its symptoms in children

Overview

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder that affects children and can continue into adulthood. It is characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. These symptoms can have a significant impact on a child’s ability to function in daily life, including school, home, and social settings. In this blog post, we will provide an overview of ADHD, including its symptoms, causes, and treatment options. We will also discuss the importance of early diagnosis and intervention for children with ADHD.

Causes of ADHD

The causes of ADHD are not fully understood, but research suggests that a combination of genetic, environmental, and neurobiological factors may play a role. Studies have shown that ADHD tends to run in families, suggesting a genetic component to the disorder.

Research has also indicated that certain environmental factors may contribute to the development of ADHD. These may include:

  • Exposure to certain toxins or pollutants during pregnancy or early childhood
  • Low birth weight or premature birth
  • Brain injuries
  • Nutritional deficiencies

Neurobiological research has also suggested that ADHD may be caused by imbalances in certain neurotransmitters in the brain, which are responsible for regulating attention and behavior. It’s also found that structural and functional differences in certain areas of the brain may be associated with ADHD.

It’s important to note that ADHD is a complex disorder and that the causes are likely to be multifactorial, meaning that multiple factors contribute to its development.

Recognizing the symptoms of ADHD in children: Common signs and behaviors.

Recognizing the symptoms of ADHD in children can be challenging, as the disorder can manifest differently in each child. However, there are some common signs and behaviors that may indicate the presence of ADHD.

(a) Inattention symptoms:

  • Difficulty paying attention to details or making careless mistakes
  • Difficulty staying focused on tasks or activities
  • Forgetfulness
  • Struggles to follow instructions
  • Poor memory

(b) Hyperactivity symptoms:

  • Fidgeting or squirming in seat
  • Difficulty sitting still
  • Excessive talking
  • Difficulty remaining quiet in appropriate situations
  • Running or climbing in inappropriate situations

(c) Impulsivity symptoms:

  • Acting without thinking
  • Interrupting others
  • Difficulty waiting their turn
  • Blurting out answers before questions have been completed

It’s important to note that these symptoms must be persistent and significantly interfere with daily functioning in order for a child to be diagnosed with ADHD. A thorough evaluation by a qualified healthcare professional, such as a pediatrician, child psychologist, or child psychiatrist, is needed to make a diagnosis.

Differentiating between normal behavior and ADHD symptoms: How to distinguish between the two.

Differentiating between normal behavior and ADHD symptoms can be challenging, as some symptoms of ADHD may be present in all children at some point during their development. However, it’s important to note that the symptoms of ADHD are more severe, persistent, and disruptive than typical behaviors in children.

A child with ADHD will have symptoms that are consistently present in multiple settings, such as at home and at school, and that significantly interfere with their ability to function in daily life. In contrast, normal behaviors in children are typically age-appropriate and are not persistent or disruptive.

It is also important to consider the child’s development stage and the context in which the symptoms are observed. For example, a child who is easily distracted and forgetful during a lesson may not have ADHD, but a child who consistently has trouble paying attention and staying focused in multiple subjects, and also in other activities such as playing, may have ADHD.

It’s also important to remember that ADHD is a complex disorder, and other conditions may exist alongside it, such as learning difficulties, anxiety, or depression. Therefore, a thorough evaluation by a qualified healthcare professional is needed to make an accurate diagnosis.

Diagnosing ADHD in children: Current guidelines and best practices.

Diagnosing ADHD in children involves a comprehensive evaluation that includes several steps. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) have published guidelines for the diagnosis of ADHD in children. These guidelines recommend the following steps for the diagnosis of ADHD:

  • Obtaining a detailed history: This includes information about the child’s symptoms, developmental history, and medical, family, and social history.
  • Conducting a physical examination: This includes a general medical examination to rule out other medical conditions that may be causing the symptoms.
  • Assessing cognitive and educational functioning: This includes testing the child’s intellectual functioning and academic skills. 
  • Conducting a psychological assessment: This includes interviews with the child, parents, and teachers to gather information about the child’s behavior and symptoms.
  • Administering rating scales and checklists: These are standardized tools used to assess the severity and frequency of the child’s symptoms.
  • Making the diagnosis: Based on the information gathered, a qualified healthcare professional such as a pediatrician, child psychologist, or child psychiatrist will determine if the child meets the criteria for ADHD as per the diagnostic manual.

It’s important to note that a diagnosis of ADHD should not be made based on a single symptom or test. Instead, a diagnosis of ADHD should be based on a comprehensive evaluation that includes input from multiple sources, such as the child, parents, and teachers.

It’s also important to remember that a diagnosis of ADHD is not a life sentence, and with appropriate treatment and support, children with ADHD can lead fulfilling and successful lives.

Comorbidities and coexisting conditions: How ADHD can interact with other disorders and impact a child’s overall well-being.

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a complex disorder that can interact with other disorders and conditions, which is called comorbidities. Children with ADHD are at a higher risk of developing other conditions, such as:

  • Learning Disabilities: Children with ADHD may have difficulty with reading, writing, and math, which can lead to difficulties in school.
  • Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD): Children with ODD have a pattern of disobedient, defiant, and hostile behavior towards authority figures.
  • Conduct Disorder (CD): Children with CD have a pattern of aggressive, destructive, and deceitful behavior.
  • Anxiety and Depression: Children with ADHD are at an increased risk of developing anxiety and depression, which can significantly impact their overall well-being.
  • Sleep disorders: Children with ADHD may have difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, and have disrupted sleep patterns. 
  • Substance abuse: Children with ADHD may be at increased risk of developing substance abuse problems as they get older.

Comorbidities can make it more challenging to diagnose and treat ADHD, and can also impact a child’s overall well-being. Therefore, it is important for healthcare professionals to screen for comorbidities and address any coexisting conditions when treating children with ADHD. This can include providing appropriate therapy, counseling, or medication, as well as ensuring that the child receives the appropriate educational and social support.

Impact of ADHD on children: Challenges and potential consequences.

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can have a significant impact on a child’s life, and can lead to a number of challenges and potential consequences. Some of the most common challenges and consequences of ADHD in children include:

  • Academic difficulties: Children with ADHD may have difficulty paying attention, staying focused, and staying organized, which can lead to problems in school and difficulty with academic performance.
  • Social difficulties: Children with ADHD may have difficulty making and maintaining friendships, which can lead to social isolation and difficulties in social settings.
  • Behavioral problems: Children with ADHD may have difficulty controlling their impulses and may engage in disruptive or aggressive behavior, which can lead to problems at home and in school.
  • Emotional difficulties: Children with ADHD may have difficulty managing their emotions and may be at an increased risk of developing anxiety and depression.
  • Difficulty with self-esteem and self-worth: Children with ADHD may feel different from their peers, and may struggle with self-esteem and self-worth. 
  • Potential for Substance abuse: Children with ADHD may be at increased risk of developing substance abuse problems as they get older.

It’s important to note that children with ADHD can lead fulfilling and successful lives with appropriate treatment and support. Early diagnosis and intervention can help to minimize the impact of ADHD on a child’s life and promote positive outcomes.

Interventions and Treatments for Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

Interventions and treatments for Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can vary depending on the child’s specific needs and the severity of their symptoms. The most common interventions and treatments for children with ADHD include:

 (a) Medications: Stimulant medications, Stimulant medications are the most commonly prescribed medications for Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. They work by increasing the levels of certain neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and norepinephrine, in the brain, which can help to improve attention and reduce hyperactivity and impulsivity.

Examples of stimulant medications commonly used to treat ADHD in children include:

  • Methylphenidate (Ritalin, Concerta, Metadate, Daytrana)
  • Dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine, ProCentra)
  • Lisdexamfetamine (Vyvanse)
  • Amphetamine-dextroamphetamine (Adderall)

These medications are usually taken orally, usually in the form of tablets or capsules, and are usually taken one or more times a day, depending on the specific medication and the child’s needs. It’s important to note that stimulant medications can have side effects, such as decreased appetite, trouble sleeping, and stomach aches, and that the dosage and timing should be adjusted by a healthcare professional.

It’s important to note that the use of stimulant medications should be part of a comprehensive treatment plan that includes other interventions, such as behavioral therapy, social skills training, and school-based interventions. In addition, it’s crucial to monitor the child for potential side effects and to adjust the dosage and timing as needed with the guidance of a healthcare professional.

(b) Non-stimulant medications, such as Strattera, are also available. Non-stimulant medications are another option for treating Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. These medications work differently than stimulants and can be an alternative for children who do not respond well to or cannot tolerate stimulant medications.

One of the most common non-stimulant medications used to treat ADHD in children is Atomoxetine (Strattera). It is a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) and works by increasing the levels of norepinephrine in the brain which can help to improve attention and reduce hyperactivity and impulsivity. Strattera is usually taken orally, usually in the form of tablets or capsules, and is usually taken once a day.

It’s important to note that non-stimulant medications may take longer to start working than stimulant medications, and they can have side effects, such as decreased appetite, stomach aches, and fatigue. Therefore, it’s crucial to monitor the child for potential side effects and to adjust the dosage and timing as needed with the guidance of a healthcare professional.

As with stimulant medications, non-stimulant medications should be part of a comprehensive treatment plan that includes other interventions, such as behavioral therapy, social skills training, and school-based interventions. It’s also important to work with a healthcare professional to find the best treatment options and to adjust the treatment as needed to ensure the best outcomes for the child.

(c) Behavioral therapy: Behavioral therapy is a type of therapy that focuses on changing specific behaviors and is often used to treat Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. Behavioral therapy can help children with ADHD learn new skills, such as how to pay attention, manage impulsivity, and improve their ability to function at home and at school.

Examples of behavioral therapy that are commonly used to treat ADHD in children include:

  • Parent training: This type of therapy focuses on teaching parents and caregivers how to manage their child’s behavior and improve their ability to function at home and at school.
  • Social skills training: This type of therapy focuses on teaching children with ADHD how to interact with others and make friends.
  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT): This type of therapy focuses on helping children with ADHD learn how to manage their thoughts, emotions, and behaviors.
  • Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT): This type of therapy focuses on helping children with ADHD improve their relationships with others.

Behavioral therapy is often used in combination with other interventions, such as medication and school-based interventions, to help children with ADHD improve their ability to function at home and at school.

It’s important to note that behavioral therapy typically requires consistent participation from the child, parents, and sometimes teachers. A qualified healthcare professional, such as a child psychologist or child psychiatrist, can guide and support the process and make sure that the therapy is tailored to the child’s specific needs and goals.

(d) Psychotherapy: Psychotherapy is a type of therapy that can help children with Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) learn coping strategies and improve their self-esteem and self-worth. It’s a talking therapy that helps the child understand their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors and learn how to manage them.

Examples of psychotherapy that are commonly used to treat ADHD in children include:

  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT): This type of therapy focuses on helping children with ADHD learn how to manage their thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. 
  • Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT): This type of therapy focuses on helping children with ADHD improve their relationships with others.
  • Family therapy: This type of therapy focuses on helping the whole family understand and cope with the child’s ADHD. It can improve communication and problem-solving skills within the family.
  • Child-centered play therapy: This type of therapy uses play as a medium for the child to express their thoughts and feelings, and learn new coping strategies.
  • Mindfulness-based therapies: This type of therapy teaches children techniques to improve their focus and attention, which can be particularly beneficial for children with ADHD.

Psychotherapy is often used in combination with other interventions, such as medication and behavioral therapy, to help children with ADHD improve their ability to function at home and at school. It’s important to note that psychotherapy typically requires consistent participation from the child, and a qualified healthcare professional, such as a child psychologist or child psychiatrist, should guide and support the process and make sure that the therapy is tailored to the child’s specific needs and goals.

Social skills training: Social skills training is a type of intervention that can help children with Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) improve their ability to interact with others and make friends. Social skills training can teach children with ADHD how to understand and appropriately respond to social cues, initiate and maintain conversations, and understand and respect personal boundaries.

Examples of social skills training that are commonly used to treat ADHD in children include:

  • Social Stories: This type of training uses stories or scripts to teach children with ADHD appropriate social behaviors and responses to various social situations.
  • Role-playing: This type of training involves practicing social interactions in a safe and controlled environment to help children with ADHD feel more comfortable in real-life social situations.
  • Video feedback: This type of training involves recording children with ADHD during social interactions and providing them with feedback on their social behavior.
  • Group therapy: This type of training involves children with ADHD participating in therapy sessions with their peers, which can help them learn social skills and make friends.

Social skills training is often used in combination with other interventions, such as medication and behavioral therapy, to help children with ADHD improve their ability to function at home and at school. It’s important to note that social skills training typically requires consistent participation from the child, and a qualified healthcare professional, such as a child psychologist or child psychiatrist, should guide and support the process and make sure that the training is tailored to the child’s specific needs and goals.

(e) Occupational therapy: Occupational therapy is a type of intervention that can help children with Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) improve their fine motor skills, self-care skills, and ability to complete daily activities. Occupational therapy can help children with ADHD improve their ability to pay attention, stay organized, and manage impulsivity. 

Examples of occupational therapy that are commonly used to treat ADHD in children include:

  • Sensory integration therapy: This type of therapy uses activities and exercises to help children with ADHD better process and respond to sensory information, which can improve attention and reduce impulsivity.
  • Fine motor skill development: This type of therapy focuses on improving the child’s ability to control and coordinate small movements of their hands and fingers, which can improve their ability to complete tasks such as writing and cutting with scissors.
  • Self-care skills training: This type of therapy focuses on teaching children with ADHD how to complete basic daily activities, such as getting dressed, brushing their teeth, and making their bed.
  • Adaptive equipment and environmental modifications: This type of therapy involves making adjustments to the child’s environment, such as providing adaptive equipment or modifying the layout of the child’s room, to make it easier for them to complete daily activities.

Occupational therapy is often used in combination with other interventions, such as medication and behavioral therapy, to help children with ADHD improve their ability to function at home and at school. It’s important to note that occupational therapy typically requires consistent participation from the child, and a qualified healthcare professional, such as an occupational therapist, should guide and support the process and make sure that the therapy is tailored to the child’s specific needs and goals.

(f) School-based interventions: School-based interventions are a type of intervention that can help children with Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) succeed in the classroom. These interventions can help children with ADHD improve their ability to pay attention, stay organized, and manage impulsivity, and can help teachers and other school staff support the child’s needs.

Examples of school-based interventions that are commonly used to treat ADHD in children include:

  • Individualized Education Plans (IEPs): An IEP is a document that outlines the child’s specific needs and the accommodations and support that will be provided to help them succeed in the classroom.
  • Accommodations: Examples of accommodations that can be made in the classroom to support children with ADHD include extra time on tests, use of a computer to take notes, and preferential seating.
  • Classroom strategies: Examples of strategies that teachers can use to support children with ADHD in the classroom include providing clear instructions, breaking tasks into smaller steps, and using visual aids.
  • Behavior management plans: A behavior management plan outlines specific strategies for addressing challenging behaviors and can be used to support children with ADHD in the classroom.
  • Collaboration with healthcare professionals: Regular communication and collaboration between school staff and healthcare professionals, such as a pediatrician or child psychologist, can help ensure that the child’s needs are being met and that the interventions are effective.

It’s important to note that school-based interventions typically require consistent participation from the child, teachers, and other school staff support the children’s needs.

(g) Occupational therapy: Occupational therapy is a type of intervention that can help children with Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) improve their fine motor skills, self-care skills, and ability to complete daily activities. Occupational therapy can help children with ADHD improve their ability to pay attention, stay organized, and manage impulsivity.

Examples of occupational therapy that are commonly used to treat ADHD in children include:

  • Sensory integration therapy: This type of therapy uses activities and exercises to help children with ADHD better process and respond to sensory information, which can improve attention and reduce impulsivity. 
  • Fine motor skill development: This type of therapy focuses on improving the child’s ability to control and coordinate small movements of their hands and fingers, which can improve their ability to complete tasks such as writing and cutting with scissors.
  • Self-care skills training: This type of therapy focuses on teaching children with ADHD how to complete basic daily activities, such as getting dressed, brushing their teeth, and making their bed.
  • Adaptive equipment and environmental modifications: This type of therapy involves making adjustments to the child’s environment, such as providing adaptive equipment or modifying the layout of the child’s room, to make it easier for them to complete daily activities.

Occupational therapy is often used in combination with other interventions, such as medication and behavioral therapy, to help children with ADHD improve their ability to function at home and at school. It’s important to note that occupational therapy typically requires consistent participation from the child, and a qualified healthcare professional, such as an occupational therapist, should guide and support the process and make sure that the therapy is tailored to the child’s specific needs and goals.

It’s important to note that children with ADHD may have different needs and may respond differently to different interventions. Therefore, it’s essential to work with a qualified healthcare professional, such as a pediatrician, child psychologist, or child psychiatrist, to develop an individualized treatment plan that addresses the child’s specific needs. It’s also important to remember that interventions and treatment for ADHD should be ongoing and regularly reviewed to ensure they are still effective and appropriate. Additionally, a multidisciplinary approach including the involvement of parents, teachers, and other support systems is crucial for the successful management of ADHD.

Conclusion: Current understanding of ADHD in children and areas for future research.

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder that affects children and can continue into adulthood. It is characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. While the causes of ADHD are not fully understood, research suggests that a combination of genetic, environmental, and neurobiological factors may play a role.

Current understanding of ADHD in children has improved significantly in recent years, but there are still many areas for future research. For example, more research is needed to better understand the underlying causes of ADHD, as well as the long-term outcomes of the disorder. Additionally, research is needed to further develop and improve treatment options for children with ADHD, including both medication and non-medication based interventions.

Furthermore, there is a need for research on how to improve the identification of children with ADHD, especially in under-served communities, and how to provide appropriate support and services for these children and their families.

Overall, it is important to continue to invest in research on ADHD in order to improve our understanding of the disorder and to develop more effective treatments and support for children and families affected by ADHD.

Additional Resources: Suggestions for parents, caregivers, and healthcare providers to find more information.

There are many resources available for parents, caregivers, and healthcare providers to find more information about ADHD in children. Some suggestions include: 

  • American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP): The AAP has a wealth of information on ADHD, including guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of the disorder, as well as information for parents and caregivers.
  • American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP): The AACAP also has a wealth of information on ADHD, including guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of the disorder, as well as information for parents and caregivers.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has a webpage dedicated to ADHD providing general information about the disorder, as well as information on diagnosis, treatment and support.
  • National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH): The NIMH has a webpage dedicated to ADHD providing information on the causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of the disorder.
  • Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD): CHADD is a national organization that provides information, resources, and support for individuals with ADHD and their families.
  • Attention Deficit Disorder Association (ADDA): ADDA is an international organization that provides information, resources, and support for individuals with ADHD and their families.
  • It is important to consult with a qualified healthcare professional, such as a pediatrician, child psychologist, or child psychiatrist, when seeking information and support for ADHD. They can provide personalized guidance, answer questions and connect you with the appropriate resources.

Young african girl sneezing due to flu

How Long Does the Flu Last?

Overview


The flu, also known as influenza, is a highly contagious viral infection that affects the respiratory system. It can cause a range of symptoms, from mild to severe, and can lead to serious complications, particularly in certain populations such as young children, older adults, and individuals with certain underlying health conditions. With season around the corner, it is important to understand how long the flu lasts, how to prevent it and what to do in case you catch it. In this blog post, we will explore the incubation period, the duration of symptoms, factors that can affect the duration of the flu, ways to shorten the duration of symptoms and when to seek medical attention. Whether you’re a parent, a caregiver or just someone looking to protect themselves, this information can be crucial in preventing the spread of the flu and managing symptoms.

How long is the incubation period for the flu?

The incubation period for the flu is the time between when a person is exposed to the virus and when symptoms first appear. Typically, this period is 1-4 days, with an average of 2 days. This means that a person may be contagious and able to spread the virus to others before they even know they have the it.

How long do flu symptoms typically last?

The symptoms can vary from person to person, but most cases last for about 1-2 weeks. The most severe symptoms, such as fever and body aches, typically last for about 3-5 days. However, some individuals may experience lingering symptoms such as fatigue and congestion for up to 2 weeks.

Are there any factors that can affect the duration of this infection?

Several factors can affect the duration, including:

  • The individual’s overall health and immune system
  • The specific strain of influenza virus
  • The severity of symptoms
  • Whether the individual receives antiviral medication.

How can I shorten the duration of my symptoms?

There are several things that can be done to help shorten the duration of symptoms:

  • Getting plenty of rest
  • Drinking fluids to stay hydrated
  • Taking over-the-counter pain relievers to reduce fever and body aches
  • Using decongestants to relieve nasal congestion
  • Using humidifiers to moisten the air and make it easier to breathe

When should I seek medical attention ?

It is important to seek medical attention if you experience severe symptoms or if you are at high risk for complications. Seek immediate medical attention if you experience any of the following:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Persistent chest pain or pressure
  • Bluish lips or face
  • High fever that does not respond to medication
  • Confusion or difficulty waking up
  • Severe vomiting or diarrhea

Additionally, individuals at high risk for complications, such as young children, older adults, and individuals with certain underlying health conditions, should seek medical attention if they suspect they have the flu. Antiviral medications can be prescribed to help reduce the severity and duration of symptoms, as well as prevent complications.

In conclusion, the flu is a highly contagious viral infection that affects the respiratory system. The incubation period is typically 1-4 days, and symptoms typically last for about 1-2 weeks. However, the duration can vary depending on several factors and it is important to seek medical attention if you experience severe symptoms or if you are at high risk for complications.

F.Q.A

Q1: How long is the incubation period for the flu?

A1: The incubation period for the flu is typically 1-4 days, with an average of 2 days.


Q2: How long do flu symptoms typically last?

A2: The duration of flu symptoms can vary from person to person, but most cases last for about 1-2 weeks. The most severe symptoms, such as fever and body aches, typically last for about 3-5 days. However, some individuals may experience lingering symptoms such as fatigue and congestion for up to 2 weeks.

Q3: Are there any factors that can affect the duration of the flu?

A3: Several factors can affect the duration of the flu, including the individual’s overall health and immune system, the specific strain of influenza virus, the severity of symptoms, and whether the individual receives antiviral medication.


Q4: How can I shorten the duration of my flu symptoms?

A4: To shorten the duration of flu symptoms, it is recommended to get plenty of rest, drink fluids to stay hydrated, take over-the-counter pain relievers to reduce fever and body aches, use decongestants to relieve nasal congestion, and use humidifiers to moisten the air and make it easier to breathe.


Q5: When should I seek medical attention for the flu?

A5: If you experience severe symptoms such as difficulty breathing, chest pain, persistent vomiting, or signs of dehydration, it is important to seek medical attention immediately. Additionally, if you are in a high-risk group such as young children, older adults, or individuals with certain underlying health conditions, it is important to consult with a healthcare provider as soon as you experience flu symptoms.

A doctor taking an history from a female patient

Struvite Kidney Stones: Its Causes, Symptoms and Treatments

Struvite kidney stones are a type of kidney stones that are not as well-known as other types, such as calcium oxalate stones. However, struvite stones are actually quite common, accounting for about 15-20% of all kidney stones. 

Overview

Struvite kidney stones are made of magnesium, ammonium, and phosphate, and they can form when there is an infection present in the urinary tract. The stones can range in size from tiny grains of sand to large, golf-ball sized stones.
They are also known as “staghorn stones” because of their resemblance to the horns of a stag. These stones can grow to be very large and can cause obstruction in the urinary tract.
Struvite stones are most common in women and can cause a number of symptoms, such as pain, bleeding, and urinary infections. 

Struvite-kidney-stones


If you think you may have struvite stones, it’s important to see a doctor so that you can receive the proper diagnosis and treatment. Keep reading to learn more about struvite stones, including their causes, symptoms, and treatments.

Symptoms of struvite kidney stones

Sometimes small stones  can pass through without symptoms. Where as larger to may pass and cause intensive pain, back-up of urine, and other health problems. Other symptoms may include: Severe pain on either side of  lower back or groin Nausea and vomiting, Fever and chills Urinary incontinence Pain during urination Blood in the urine( Hematuria)Urine that smells bad or looks cloudy. If the stone is large enough, it can block the ureter (the tube that carries urine from the kidney to the bladder) and cause severe pain.

Symptoms of struvite stones

In other cases symptoms related to a UTI include a persistent urge to urinate, a burning sensation during urination, or passing frequent and small amounts of urine. Urine that looks red, pink or dark means there is blood in the urine. If you experience any of these symptoms, it’s important to see a doctor right away. What are the causes struvite stones?

How struvite kidney stones are formed?

This type of kidney stones are formed when there is an excess of phosphate in the body. This can happen when there is a urinary tract infection that’s  caused by bacteria or chronic kidney disease. Ammonium that’s produced by bacteria helps to make the urine less acidic or with more alkali (alkaline urine). As the urine becomes more alkaline, struvite stones is formed.
Struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate) is a phosphate mineral with formula:NH4MgPO4.6H2O( Struvite crystallizes in the orthorhombic system as a white  to yellow  or brownish-white pyramidal crystals or in platy mica-like form)  with calcium carbon- apatite.
 Therefore  when magnesium, phosphate and carbonate are allowed to accumulate in the urinary bladder will results to the formation of struvite stones, which are larger than other types of kidney stones. When these substances becomes  harder, they can form stones. They tend to be larger  than other types of kidney stones. These stones are more common in women than in men. 

Prevention of struvite kidney stones

The best way to prevent struvite stones is to keep your urinary tract healthy. This means making sure have taken plenty of water to drink and keeping yourself on a healthy diet. By drinking enough amount of water this will help to lower the urine concentration  with waste products. Being urinary tract healthy will also help reduce the chances of other problems, such as UTIs.
Another way to prevent  struvite stones formation, your doctor  may seek to prescribe some medications  such as Acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) which help to prevent bacteria from making ammonia, as it is know ammonia  may help growing of these stones. Also antibiotics may be described  for some period of time after the removal of stones. And this will help to prevent  recurrent UTIs which may lead to the stones being  formed once again. 

How struvite kidney stones diagnosed?

Medical professionals can use a variety of tests to diagnose struvite stones in humans. These tests may include assessing the person’s medical history, physical examination, urinalysis, blood tests, and imaging tests.

What is the treatment of struvite kidney stones?

The first  recommendation for the people with such kind of kidney stones  is drinking enough amount of water that will help to lower the urine concentration.
Also treatment for struvite stones usually involves antibiotics to clear the infection causing UTIs. 
Supplemented with a low-phosphate diet. THIAZIDE DIURETICS  (water pills)  or TAMSULOSIN ( that help ureter relaxation and allow the stones to pass).

In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove the stone. Ureteroscopy uses a small scope to remove stones.

Surgery of struvite kidney stones

Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) also known as extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy that uses high-energy  acoustic  pulses that break up the stones into smaller particles  that will pass with urine.
Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) surgically  will remove the stones via the back. In other cases a serious surgical management  is required  for complete removal of stones and these procedure is known as Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL).
If you think you may have a struvite stone, it is important to see a doctor so that the proper treatment can be administered.

When to see a doctor?

Physiotherapist doing healing treatment
Physiotherapist doing healing treatment

If you think you may have struvite kidney stones in your body, it’s important to see a doctor right away. Struvite stones are a type of kidney stone that can cause serious health problems. This stones are usually treated with surgery, so it’s important to get treatment as soon as possible.